Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

WiMAX Technology :


What is WiMAX Technology :

  • WiMAX stands for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access. WiMAX technology is a telecommunications technology that offers transmission of wireless data via a number of transmission methods; such as portable or fully mobile internet access via point to multipoints links. The WiMAX technology offers around 72 Mega Bits per second without any need for the cable infrastructure. WiMAX technology is based on Standard that is IEEE 802.16, it usually also called as Broadband Wireless Access. WiMAX Forum created the name for WiMAX technology that was formed in Mid June 2001 to encourage compliance and interoperability of the WiMAX IEEE 802.16 standard. WiMAX technology is actually based on the standards that making the possibility to delivery last mile broadband access as a substitute to conventional cable and DSL lines.

  • WiMAX technology is based on Standard that is IEEE 802.16, it usually also called as Broadband Wireless Access. WiMAX Forum created the name for WiMAX technology that was formed in Mid June 2001 to encourage compliance and interoperability of the WiMAX IEEE 802.16 standard. WiMAX technology is actually based on the standards that making the possibility to delivery last mile broadband access as a substitute to conventional cable and DSL lines.


How WiMAX Works :


  • The backhaul of the WiMAX (802.16) is based on the typical connection to the public wireless networks by using optical fibre, microwave link, cable or any other high speed connectivity. In few cases such as mesh networks, Point-to-Multi-Point (PMP) connectivity is also used as a backhaul. Ideally, WiMAX (802.16) should use Point-to-Point antennas as a backhaul to join subscriber sites to each other and to base stations across long distance. A WiMAX base station serves subscriber stations using Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) or LOS Point-to-Multi-Point connectivity; and this connection is referred to as the last mile communication. Ideally, WiMAX (802.16) should use NLOS Point-to-Multi-Point antennas to connect residential or business subscribers to the WiMAX Base Station (BS). A Subscriber Station (WiMAX CPE) typically serves a building using wired or wireless LAN

  • Ideally, WiMAX (802.16) should use Point-to-Point antennas as a backhaul to join subscriber sites to each other and to base stations across long distance. A WiMAX base station serves subscriber stations using Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) or LOS Point-to-Multi-Point connectivity; and this connection is referred to as the last mile communication. Ideally, WiMAX (802.16) should use NLOS Point-to-Multi-Point antennas to connect residential or business subscribers to the WiMAX Base Station (BS). A Subscriber Station (WiMAX CPE) typically serves a building using wired or wireless LAN



Applications :


The bandwidth and range of WiMAX make it suitable but not limited for the following potential applications:


  • Providing a wireless alternative to cable and DSL for "last mile" broadband access.

  • Providing data, telecommunications (VoIP) and IPTV services (triple play).

  • Providing a source of Internet connectivity as part of a business continuity plan. That is, if a business has both a fixed and a wireless Internet connection, especially from unrelated providers, it is less likely to be affected by the same service outage.

  • Providing a network to facilitate machine to machine communications, such as for Smart Metering.



Powered By :